Labor & Delivery
Care for the newborn during the golden hour

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Labor and Delivery


Resuscitation and stabilization in the labor and delivery unit

The transition from fetus to newborn requires intervention by a skilled individual or team in approximately 10% of all deliveries.1  Whether a newborn is breathing independently or needs help becomes evident within 60 seconds

after birth.2 The medical team needs to be prepared to react and make quick decisions in this first minute. They need to be prepared and have equipment available to support breathing, suction and provide heat regulation.

Find newborn respiratory support recommendations and guidelines from all over the world here.

For more research, articles and information go to the download center.

1Robin L Bissinger, PhD, APRN, NNP-BC. Neonatal Resuscitation

2Pediatrics, Official Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Vol. 126, No.5, Nov 2010, P e1401 

Learn from expert Dr. Colin Morley

Dr. Colin Morley discusses the resuscitation and stabilization of the newborn infant with particular focus on the preterm infant.  He explains the importance of CPAP and PEEP use and the different components of a t-piece. Furthermore, he reviews the important things to remember when using a t-piece device and how to check for effectiveness when ventilating the infant. 

1 Robin L Bissinger, PhD, APRN, NNP-BC. Neonatal Resuscitation

2 Pediatrics, Official Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Vol. 126, No.5, Nov 2010, P e1401